Monday, March 4, 2024
spot_img
HomeREMOTE TECHNOLOGIESMortgage Rates for Sept. 8, 2023: Rates Tick Up ...

Mortgage Rates for Sept. 8, 2023: Rates Tick Up – CNET

A variety of major mortgage rates inched up over the last seven days. The average interest rates for both 15-year fixed and 30-year fixed mortgage rates both trended upward. We also saw a decrease in the average rate of 5/1 adjustable-rate mortgages.

As inflation surged in 2022, so too did mortgage rates. To rein in price growth, the Federal Reserve began bumping up its federal funds rate — a short-term interest rate that determines what banks charge each other to borrow money. By making it more expensive to borrow, the central bank’s goal is to reduce prices by curtailing consumer spending.

During its July 26 meeting, the Fed initiated a 25-basis point (or 0.25%) hike to its federal funds rate, marking its 11th increase in the current rate hiking cycle. The most recent increase could have an impact on mortgage rates, but experts say the markets may have already factored it into rates.

About these rates: Like CNET, Bankrate is owned by Red Ventures. This tool features partner rates from lenders that you can use when comparing multiple mortgage rates.

“Mortgage rates will continue to ebb and flow week to week, but ultimately, I think rates will stick to that 6% to 7% range we’re seeing now,” said Jacob Channel, senior economist at loan marketplace LendingTree.

The Fed doesn’t set mortgage rates directly, but it does play an influential role. Mortgage rates move around on a daily basis in response to a range of economic factors, including inflation, employment and the broader outlook for the economy. A lower inflation rate is good news for mortgage rates, but the potential for additional hikes from the central bank this year will keep upward pressure on already high rates.

Rather than worrying about mortgage rates, though, homebuyers should focus on what they can control: getting the best rate they can for their financial situation.

To increase your odds at qualifying for the lowest rate available, take the steps necessary to improve your credit score and to save for a down payment. Also, be sure to compare the rates and fees from multiple lenders to get the best deal. Looking at the annual percentage rate, or APR, will show you the total cost of borrowing and help you make an apples-to-apples comparison among lenders.

30-year fixed-rate mortgages

The 30-year fixed-mortgage rate average is 7.55%, which is an increase of 2 basis points from one week ago. (A basis point is equivalent to 0.01%.) Thirty-year fixed mortgages are the most frequently used loan term. A 30-year fixed mortgage will usually have a higher interest rate than a 15-year fixed rate mortgage — but also a lower monthly payment. You won’t be able to pay off your house as quickly and you’ll pay more interest over time, but a 30-year fixed mortgage is a good option if you’re looking to minimize your monthly payment.

15-year fixed-rate mortgages

The average rate for a 15-year, fixed mortgage is 6.81%, which is an increase of 5 basis points from the same time last week. Compared to a 30-year fixed mortgage, a 15-year fixed mortgage with the same loan value and interest rate will have a larger monthly payment. But a 15-year loan will usually be the better deal, if you’re able to afford the monthly payments. You’ll usually get a lower interest rate, and you’ll pay less interest in total because you’re paying off your mortgage much quicker.

5/1 adjustable-rate mortgages

A 5/1 adjustable-rate mortgage has an average rate of 6.55%, a slide of 1 basis point compared to a week ago. You’ll usually get a lower interest rate (compared to a 30-year fixed mortgage) with a 5/1 ARM in the first five years of the mortgage. But since the rate shifts with the market rate, you may end up paying more after that time, as described in the terms of your loan. For borrowers who plan to sell or refinance their house before the rate changes, an adjustable-rate mortgage may be a good option. Otherwise, changes in the market mean your interest rate may be a good deal higher once the rate adjusts.

Mortgage rate trends

Mortgage rates were historically low throughout most of 2020 and 2021, but increased steadily throughout 2022 as the Federal Reserve began aggressively hiking interest rates. Now, mortgage rates are well above where they were a year ago. What does this mean for homebuyers this year?

“Mortgage rates have hovered in the 6% to 7% range for the past 10 months. Though home prices have softened slightly nationally, the still-high cost of borrowing means hopeful home buyers have felt little relief,” said Hannah Jones, economic research analyst at Realtor.com.

However, if inflation continues to decline and the Fed is able to hold rates where they are and eventually cut them, mortgage rates are likely to decrease slightly in 2023. However, they’re highly unlikely to return to the rock-bottom levels of just a few years ago.

The most recent housing forecast from Fannie Mae calls for the average 30-year fixed mortgage rate to close out the year at around 6.6%.

“Mortgage rates have been volatile for some time now and while they could eventually start trending down over the next six months to a year as inflation growth continues to cool, their path is probably going to be bumpy,” Channel said.

We use rates collected by Bankrate to track changes in these daily rates. This table summarizes the average rates offered by lenders across the US:

Today’s mortgage interest rates

Loan term Today’s Rate Last week Change
30-year mortgage rate 7.55% 7.53% +0.02
15-year fixed rate 6.81% 6.76% +0.05
30-year jumbo mortgage rate 7.57% 7.55% +0.02
30-year mortgage refinance rate 7.76% 7.66% +0.10

Rates as of Sept. 8, 2023.

How to shop for the best mortgage rate

You can get a personalized mortgage rate by reaching out to your local mortgage broker or using an online calculator. In order to find the best home mortgage, you’ll need to consider your goals and overall financial situation.

A range of factors — including your down payment, credit score, loan-to-value ratio and debt-to-income ratio — will all affect your mortgage rate. Generally, you want a higher credit score, a larger down payment, a lower DTI and a lower LTV to get a lower interest rate.

Besides the mortgage interest rate, other factors including closing costs, fees, discount points and taxes might also factor into the cost of your house. You should comparison shop with multiple lenders — including credit unions and online lenders in addition to local and national banks — in order to get a mortgage that’s right for you.

What’s the best loan term?

One important consideration when choosing a mortgage is the loan term, or payment schedule. The most common mortgage terms are 15 years and 30 years, although 10-, 20- and 40-year mortgages also exist. Mortgages are further divided into fixed-rate and adjustable-rate mortgages. For fixed-rate mortgages, interest rates are stable for the life of the loan. For adjustable-rate mortgages, interest rates are the same for a certain number of years (commonly five, seven or 10 years), then the rate fluctuates annually based on the current interest rate in the market.

One important factor to consider when choosing between a fixed-rate and adjustable-rate mortgage is the length of time you plan on living in your home. Fixed-rate mortgages might be a better fit for those who plan on staying in a home for quite some time. Fixed-rate mortgages offer more stability over time in comparison to adjustable-rate mortgages, but adjustable-rate mortgages can sometimes offer lower interest rates upfront. However, you might get a better deal with an adjustable-rate mortgage if you only have plans to keep your home for a couple years. There is no best loan term as a general rule; it all depends on your goals and your current financial situation. Make sure to do your research and think about your own priorities when choosing a mortgage.

 

Post Disclaimer

The information provided in our posts or blogs are for educational and informative purposes only. We do not guarantee the accuracy, completeness or suitability of the information. We do not provide financial or investment advice. Readers should always seek professional advice before making any financial or investment decisions based on the information provided in our content. We will not be held responsible for any losses, damages or consequences that may arise from relying on the information provided in our content.

RELATED ARTICLES

Most Popular

Recent Comments